• Support a comprehensive, five-year reauthorization of the Runaway and Homeless Youth and Trafficking Prevention Act and increase annual appropriations to no less than $165 million for FY2020. The Runaway and Homeless Youth Act is the only federal funding source that is youth-focused and uniquely tailored to the needs of homeless young people. Runaway and Homeless Youth (RHY) program outcomes are developmentally appropriate and reflect best practice for youth. Despite the effectiveness of RHY programs, funding levels have remained relatively flat while the rates of youth homelessness have risen dramatically.
  • Support no less than $102.5 million for YouthBuild programs in FY2020 so young people can access apprenticeships and family-wage employment. Across the nation, cities are struggling to fill shortages of skilled workers. YouthBuild is an evidence-based pre-apprenticeship program that gets young people re-engaged with school and connected to family-wage jobs in the trades.
  • Support no less than $2.8 billion for HUD’s McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Grants (HAG) program for FY2020 to fund shelter and housing programs throughout our community; demand exceeds capacity at all programs and community prioritization often puts youth programs at the bottom of the list.
  • Pass the Homeless Children and Youth Act to change the HUD definition of homelessness and standardize the definition across federal agencies. HUD’s definition of homelessness makes it difficult for couch-surfing and unstably housed youth to access housing resources even though they have no stable place to call home.
  • Pass the Housing for Homeless Students Act to allow homeless youth who are full-time students to remain in low-income housing. The Low-Income Housing Tax Credit Program does not allow tenants to be full-time students, with exceptions for former foster youth, single parents, and parents receiving public assistance. Many grants and scholarships require full-time attendance to be eligible; part-time students take longer to graduate, have higher cumulative tuition costs, and greater opportunity costs of attending school.